<div dir="ltr"><div>There have been some excellent studies done that show the prominence of hardcoded secrets in the string tables of mobile apps. I would argue that hardcoded secrets shouldn't exist in the first place.  However, as I mentioned in the other thread, there are plenty of scenarios where it's simply not possible to avoid this.  I agree with what you are stating<br><br></div>You also stated that rogue versions of apps are possible as a result.  This is another excellent point.  There was a study recently conducted that shows that <b>nearly 1/4 of all Google Play apps have been cloned and made into malicious versions</b> on third party sites.<br></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Nov 3, 2014 at 11:58 PM, Erwin Geirnaert <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:erwin.geirnaert@zionsecurity.com" target="_blank">erwin.geirnaert@zionsecurity.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi Andrew,<br>
<br>
If mobile code is not obfuscated it can be a starting point to detect hard-coded secrets.<br>
Code that is not obfuscated can also be easily abused to create rogue malicious apps, especially for Android.<br>
<br>
So I think it should be there.<br>
<br>
Best regards,<br>
<br>
Erwin<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
-----Original Message-----<br>
From: <a href="mailto:owasp-leaders-bounces@lists.owasp.org">owasp-leaders-bounces@lists.owasp.org</a> [mailto:<a href="mailto:owasp-leaders-bounces@lists.owasp.org">owasp-leaders-bounces@lists.owasp.org</a>] On Behalf Of Andrew van der Stock<br>
Sent: 04 November 2014 08:07<br>
To: <a href="mailto:owasp-leaders@lists.owasp.org">owasp-leaders@lists.owasp.org</a><br>
Subject: [Owasp-leaders] OWASP Mobile Top 10 - potential conflict of interest in M10<br>
<br>
Hi folks,<br>
<br>
I've had some feedback on Twitter about the OWASP Mobile Top 10.<br>
Number 10 includes a control that I don't believe is a sound security control (security through obfuscation). Coupled with the nature of the employers of those who contributed, all of whom have some form of obfuscation product, I'm really not comfortable that M10 is a sound control or the risk of binary analysis is so high that requires it (no other OWASP standard contains it!), and more to the point M10 has a strong appearance of conflict of interest.<br>
<br>
I know many of those involved in the project, and don't doubt for a second their honest desire to create actionable advice, but I am very concerned that the Mobile Top 10 has an obfuscation control written in by folks who sell obfuscation controls.<br>
<br>
Can we please see the research that demonstrates that binary analysis is one of the top threats to well written mobile code? I use it as a way to improve my client's apps, and obfuscation just makes my job harder, not the code safer.<br>
<br>
thanks<br>
Andrew<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
OWASP-Leaders mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:OWASP-Leaders@lists.owasp.org">OWASP-Leaders@lists.owasp.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-leaders" target="_blank">https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-leaders</a><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
OWASP-Leaders mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:OWASP-Leaders@lists.owasp.org">OWASP-Leaders@lists.owasp.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-leaders" target="_blank">https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-leaders</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>