<html><body>Sorry for being paranoid but one past experience I had made me this way. I have served as lead author for a variety of books and was working on one book where a co-author contributed well-written content. The funny thing was the day before I needed to turn over the manuscript, I met with this person's employer whom proceeded to provide me with a manual and license for their software. Since I now had a work and home context for understanding this software, I proceeded to read the material and to my shock, I discovered much of the same content.<br><br>This was an interesting situation to manage as I had to figure out a graceful way of saving face with the publisher (In hindsight, I think I made bad even worse), I had to fire the author and I had to also take on personally rewriting all the chapters for this individual at the last minute. Of course, this caused the book to suffer and my significant other to get really torqued at taking a time consuming activity and making it even longer.<br><br>Remember as the leader of this project, I not only have a duty to deliver, I have an equal duty to make sure that all members who contribute are not wasting their times as well. Both are of equal importance to me...<br><br>
<blockquote webmail="1" style="border-left: 2px solid blue; margin-left: 8px; padding-left: 8px;">
-------- Original Message --------<br>
Subject: Re: [Owasp-cert] Deadlines for August<br>
From: "Matthew Chalmers" &lt;matthew.chalmers@owasp.org&gt;<br>
Date: Mon, July 28, 2008 3:57 pm<br>
To: <a href="mailto:james@architectbook.com">james@architectbook.com</a><br>
Cc: <a href="mailto:owasp-cert@lists.owasp.org">owasp-cert@lists.owasp.org</a><br>
<br>
<div dir="ltr"><div>Ah, that makes more sense now, thanks for clarifying. There might be some problems, though.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>1. Some people will&nbsp;decline to submit exam content--possibly content which could be great for the exam--because they're required to provide their company name but can't (some people will ask their company and the company will say no)&nbsp;or&nbsp;don't want to, for whatever reason, valid or no. This also makes OWASP appear not as "free and open." The only way I see around this is to have everyone who submits content sign or agree to some kind of waiver which states they created what they are submitting and can be held personally responsible if otherwise, however, this will still cause some people to decline to submit content.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>2. Some companies that are surprised to find their name associated with this project&nbsp;or OWASP may attempt to take action against OWASP or the individual from the company. It may be as simple as asking us to remove their name but it could be worse, for OWASP or the individual who had the best intentions and was just doing what OWASP said.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>3. We may need our own privacy policy for this project. No other OWASP project I'm aware of requires volunteers to give their company name because it's irrelevant. Sure OWASP in general would like to have respected company names associated with its work, as you indicated,&nbsp;but it's never been compulsory. If we require content submitters to submit anything--at all--other than the exam content they've come up with, that we intend to use somehow other than perhaps storing away in a database (which has its own concerns), we may need to have a disclosure statement about how we intend to use that info. So this is legal document/contract number 2, or maybe 3 (see #1 above). And we know you really, really, really, really, really, hate NDAs. ;-)</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>There may be other problems I haven't thought of...</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Matt</div><br></div> 
</blockquote></body></html>