<div dir="ltr"><h2 class="" style="margin:0px;padding:0px 0px 0px 11.59375px;border:0px;outline:0px;font-size:2.3em;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:bebas_neueregular,Helvetica,sans-serif;letter-spacing:0.04em;color:rgb(153,153,170);font-weight:normal;width:551px;max-width:95%;min-width:135px">
Abusing NoSQL Databases</h2><h4 class="" title="DEF CON 21: Chow - Abusing NoSQL Databases" style="margin:3px 0px 10px;padding:8px 0px 1px 10px;border:0px;outline:0px;font-size:0.9em;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:EIVENMAJORPixel,Helvetica,sans-serif;line-height:1em;color:rgb(153,238,255);font-weight:normal;text-transform:uppercase;width:556.796875px;max-width:96%;border-top-left-radius:5px;border-top-right-radius:5px;border-bottom-right-radius:5px;border-bottom-left-radius:5px">
MING CHOW<span class="" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;outline:0px;font-size:0.7em;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent"> LECTURER, TUFTS UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE</span><br></h4>
<p class="" style="margin:20px 0px 30px 11.59375px;padding:0px;border:0px;outline:0px;font-size:14px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:rgb(0,0,0);line-height:1.5em;color:rgb(204,221,204);font-family:ArimoRegular,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif">
The days of selecting from a few SQL database options for an application are over. There is now a plethora of NoSQL database options to choose from: some are better than others for certain jobs. There are good reasons why developers are choosing them over traditional SQL databases including performance, scalabiltiy, and ease-of-use. Unfortunately like for many hot techologies, security is largely an afterthought in NoSQL databases. This short but concise presentation will illustrate how poor the quality of security in many NoSQL database systems is. This presentation will not be confined to one particular NoSQL database system. Two sets of security issues will be discussed: those that affect all NoSQL database systems such as defaults, authentication, encryption; and those that affect specific NoSQL database systems such as MongoDB and CouchDB. The ideas that we now have a complicated heterogeneous problem and that defense-in-depth is even more necessary will be stressed. There is a common misconception that SQL injection attacks are eliminated by using a NoSQL database system. While specifically SQL injection is largely eliminated, injection attack vectors have increased thanks to JavaScript and the flexibility of NoSQL databases. This presentation will present and demo new classes of injection attacks. Attendees should be familiar with JavaScript and JSON. <br>
<br><span class="" style="margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;outline:0px;font-size:0.9em;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent;font-style:italic"><strong style="margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;outline:0px;vertical-align:baseline;background-color:transparent">Ming Chow</strong> (@tufts_cs_mchow) is a Lecturer at the Tufts University Department of Computer Science. His areas of work are in web and mobile engineering and web security. He teaches courses largely in the undergraduate curriculum including the second course in the major sequence, Web Programming, Music Apps on the iPad, and Introduction to Computer Security. He was also a web application developer for ten years at Harvard University. Ming has spoken at numerous organizations and conferences including the High Technology Crime Investigation Association - New England Chapter (HTCIA-NE), the Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General (AGO), John Hancock, OWASP, InfoSec World (2011 and 2012), DEF CON 19 (2011), the Design Automation Conference (2011), Intel, and the SOURCE Conference (Boston 2013). Ming's projects in information security include building numerous CTF challenges, Internet investigations, HTML5 and JavaScript security, and Android forensics.</span></p>
</div>