[Owasp-boston] Tonight: Bruce Schneier & Jonathan Zittrain Discuss IT, Security, and Power

David Larochelle owasp-boston at larochelle.name
Mon Apr 8 16:26:57 UTC 2013


If anyone was interested in this talk but was unable to attend, video and
audio records are now available online.

http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/interactive/events/2013/04/schneier

Additionally, Ethan Zuckerman live blogged the talk and has a summary
here<http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/2013/04/04/schneier-and-zittrain-on-digital-security-and-the-power-of-metaphors/>
.

--

David



On Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 4:53 PM, David Larochelle <
owasp-boston at larochelle.name> wrote:

> Here are the details of the event that I mentioned at last nights meeting:
>
> More information is available on the official site:
> http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/2013/04/schneier
>
>
>
> IT, Security, and Power Bruce Schneier & Jonathan Zittrain in conversation
>
> *April 4, 6:00pm ET
> Langdell Hall South, 272 Kirkland and Ellis Classroom*
> *Co-sponsored by the Center for Research on Computation and Society<http://crcs.seas.harvard.edu/>
> *
>
> *From Bruce Schneier:*
>
> What I've Been Thinking About
>
> I have been thinking about the Internet and power<http://www.schneier.com/essay-409.html>:
> how the Internet affects power, and how power affects the Internet.
> Increasingly, those in power are using information technology to increase
> their power. This has many facets, including the following:
>
> 1. Ubiquitous surveillance <http://www.schneier.com/essay-418.html> for
> both government and corporate purposes -- aided by cloud computing, social
> networking, and Internet-enabled everything -- resulting in a world without
> any real privacy.
>
> 2. The rise of nationalism <http://www.schneier.com/essay-416.html> on
> the Internet and a cyberwar arms race<http://www.schneier.com/essay-411.html>,
> both of which play on our fears and which are resulting in increased
> military involvement in our information infrastructure.
>
> 3. Ill-conceived laws and regulations on behalf of either government or
> corporate power, either to prop up their business models (copyright
> protections), enable more surveillance (increased police access to data),
> or control our actions in cyberspace.
>
> 4. A feudal model of security <http://www.schneier.com/essay-406.html> that
> leaves users with little control over their data or computing platforms,
> forcing them to trust the companies that sell the hardware, software, and
> systems.
>
> On the one hand, we need new regimes of trust<http://www.schneier.com/essay-410.html> in
> the information age. (I wrote about the extensively in my most recent book,
> *Liars and Outliers* <http://www.schneier.com/essay-412.html>.) On the
> other hand, the risks associated with increasing technology<http://www.schneier.com/essay-417.html> might
> mean that the fear of catastrophic attack will make us unable to create
> those new regimes.
>
> It is clear to me that we as a society are headed down a dangerous path,
> and that we need to make some hard choices about what sort of world we want
> to live in. It's not clear if we have the social or political will to
> address those choices, or even have the conversations necessary to make
> them. But I believe we need to try.
>
> **
> *About Bruce Schneier*
>
> Bruce Schneier is an internationally renowned security technologist and
> author. Described by The Economist as a "security guru," he is best known
> as a refreshingly candid and lucid security critic and commentator. When
> people want to know how security really works, they turn to Schneier.
>
> His first bestseller, Applied Cryptography<http://www.schneier.com/book-applied.html>,
> explained how the arcane science of secret codes actually works, and was
> described by Wired as "the book the National Security Agency wanted never
> to be published." His book on computer and network security, Secrets and
> Lies <http://www.schneier.com/book-sandl.html>, was called by Fortune
> "[a] jewel box of little surprises you can actually use." Beyond Fear<http://www.schneier.com/book-beyondfear.html> tackles
> the problems of security from the small to the large: personal safety,
> crime, corporate security, national security. Schneier on Security<http://www.schneier.com/book-sos.html>,
> offers insight into everything from the risk of identity theft (vastly
> overrated) to the long-range security threat of unchecked presidential
> power. His latest book, Liars and Outliers<http://www.schneier.com/book-lo.html>,
> explains how societies use security to enable the trust that they need to
> survive.
>
> Regularly quoted in the media -- and subject of an Internet meme<http://www.schneierfacts.com/> --
> he has testified on security before the United States Congress on several
> occasions and has written articles and op eds<http://www.schneier.com/essays.html> for
> many major publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian,
> Forbes,Wired, Nature, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, The Sydney
> Morning Herald, The Boston Globe, The San Francisco Chronicle, andThe
> Washington Post.
>
> Schneier also publishes a free monthly newsletter, Crypto-Gram<http://www.schneier.com/crypto-gram.html>,
> and a blog, Schneier on Security <http://www.schneier.com/>, with a
> combined 250,000 readers. In more than ten years of regular publication,
> Crypto-Gram has become one of the most widely read forums for free-wheeling
> discussions, pointed critiques, and serious debate about security. As head
> curmudgeon at the table, Schneier explains, debunks, and draws lessons from
> security stories that make the news.
>  *About Jonathan Zittrain*
>
> Jonathan Zittrain is Professor of Law<http://www.law.harvard.edu/faculty/directory/index.html?id=106> at
> Harvard Law School and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Professor
> of Computer Science at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied
> Sciences, and co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society.  His
> research interests include battles for control of digital property and
> content, cryptography, electronic privacy, the roles of intermediaries
> within Internet architecture, human computing, and the useful and
> unobtrusive deployment of technology in education.
>
>
>
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