<div dir="ltr">Ning started out as a tool that was being used solely by the OWASP Austin Chapter.  As we had (and continue to have) much success with it as a coordination platform, I asked the Board to sponsor an experiment to roll it out to the greater organization.  We've been on the Ning platform for almost 3 years now and have:<br>
<ul><li>307 members signed up to use it</li><li>17 public groups representing multiple chapters, projects, conferences, and more general appsec topics</li><li>31 photos uploaded by participants</li><li>10 videos uploaded by participants representing everything from membership plugs to conference recordings to OWASP tools</li>
<li>9 blog posts (definitely smaller than I'd like to see)</li><li>Forum posts split into 9 different topical categories</li></ul><p>We haven't been keeping detailed stats beyond that, but it does give us the ability to use Google Analytics if we so chose.  Authentication can use Google, Facebook, Twitter, and other methods as well.  I can export a list of current users if you're interested in further dissecting the "who" is using it currently.  It has role-based access controls so, as an example, I can be site admin, but allow others to moderate content, etc.  <br>
</p><ul><li>Current Ning 2.0 Platform:  <a href="http://my.owasp.org">http://my.owasp.org</a></li><li>New Ning 3.0 Platform (testing):  <a href="http://myowasp2.ning.com">http://myowasp2.ning.com</a></li></ul><p>My general feeling about it is that it's a great platform for social media presence as it integrates all of the other things people are doing (Twitter, Blogs, Messaging, Forums) into a single system.  It hasn't been extremely well utilized beyond a few niche groups to date, but it also hasn't been widely publicized either beyond an e-mail or two from me early on in 2011.  There are currently 18 administrators on the system including myself, Sarah, Michael, and Tom.  I also just found Samantha in the system as well (for some reason my search didn't turn her up before).</p>
<p>I hope that answers your questions.</p><p>~josh<br></p></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Apr 7, 2014 at 3:07 PM, Michael Coates <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:michael.coates@owasp.org" target="_blank">michael.coates@owasp.org</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div>Josh & Board,<br><br></div>We're talking a lot about ning. Since it's come up a few times I have some questions.<br>
<br>How much is it being used? Do we have numbers on how many <a href="http://owasp.org" target="_blank">owasp.org</a> people have accounts? How many edits/posts/updates per month?<br>
<br>Who is admin - is this ops team owned or an experimental community project?<br clear="all"><div><div><div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div>Aside from the quantitative questions above - what's the general feeling about it. Are people using it for some particular items instead of others? What are it's strengths and weaknesses?<br>

<br><br>Thanks!<br></div><div dir="ltr"><br>--<br>Michael Coates<br>@_mwc<br><br></div></div>
</div></div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Owasp-board mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Owasp-board@lists.owasp.org">Owasp-board@lists.owasp.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-board" target="_blank">https://lists.owasp.org/mailman/listinfo/owasp-board</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br></div>